Visitor Counter

0131802
Visit Today : 55
Visit Yesterday : 67
This Month : 1811
This Year : 4332
Total Visit : 131802
Hits Today : 160
Total Hits : 436072
Who's Online : 3
Your IP Address: 54.160.153.233
Server Time: 18-02-21
plugins by Bali Web Design

New York Unveils Offshore Wind Master Plan

From Oilprice.com
By Precise Consultants – Feb 07, 2018, 12:00 PM CST

Remember “The Simpsons” episode where Homer scoffs at the idea that one animal could provide all his favorite meat: bacon, ham, pork chops? “Yeah right, Lisa,” he chortles, “a wonderful, magical animal.” Well, the pig is to Homer what offshore wind turbines are to New York State.
New York Governor Andrew Cuomo just launched the 60-page New York State Offshore Wind Master Plan, detailing the state’s commitment to wind power and the expected gains from seeing it through:
• 2,400 MW offshore energy will power in excess of 1.2 million homes
• It will employ up to 5,000 people
• The state’s port infrastructure will be enhanced
• $15 million will be committed to training the required workforce
• The industry will be worth $6 billion in a decade
• Support the city’s goal of sourcing half of its power from renewables by 2030 (equivalent to taking 1 million cars off the road)
• Health benefits from cleaner air worth $400 million
The report is the product of two years of extensive research and is supplemented by 20 studies. The authors assessed every aspect of the plan, from cable installation, pipelines, manufacturing turbines and developing the wind farms, to wider environmental issues like the impact on birds, bats and sea life.
The result: a proposal for a 1 million acre site, 21 miles from land, due south of the Great South Bay. “For the vast majority of the time, turbines would have no discernible or visible impact for a casual viewer on the shore,” the report states. By locating so far out, the projects could avoid or minimize potential conflicts for shipping lanes, the fishing industry and wildlife.
Related: Most Big Banks Are Now Bullish On Oil
The plan acknowledges that a considerable amount of work must happen, and sets up a number of working groups to “define strategies and activities that could help members engage effectively in offshore wind energy development.” One proposal involves a workshop with leading marine scientists who will convene to assess marine ecosystem protections, develop best working practices and consider the creation of a fund to enable the projects to go ahead while providing adequate support for the environment.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *