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Fresno State Survey – Nearly Half of San Joaquin Valley Adults are Worried about Deportations

Majority Here Think that More Deportations Will Have a Negative Impact On Region’s Economy

April26,2017-

Screen Shot 2016-08-28 at 7.19.00 AMIn a new survey of the San Joaquin Valley, 46 percent of adults in the region worry that they, a family member, or a close friend could be deported. Fifty-three percent of adults in the Valley, however, are not concerned that more deportations could affect them or someone they know. The Migration Policy Institute estimates that California has 3 million undocumented immigrants residing in the state and that 12 percent, or 356,000 of them, live in the San Joaquin Valley.
Latinos disproportionally report the highest levels of concern over deportations. Sixty-eight percent said that they worry “a lot” or “some” that they or someone they know could be deported. This percentage is considerably higher than the 47 percent of Latinos nationally that expressed concern in a Pew Research Center survey in January. Non-white, non-Latino groups, including blacks and Asians, report higher levels of concern about deportations (33 percent) than whites (21 percent).
Not surprisingly, Trump supporters are not worried about deportations (90 percent said “not much” or “not at all”). In contrast, a significant majority of non-Trump supporters are concerned about deportations (63 percent). There are also clear differences across party lines. A majority of both Democrats (63 percent) and Independents (54 percent) are concerned that they or someone they know could be deported, while most Republicans, 83 percent, are not concerned.
Among those who reported voting in the 2016 presidential election, 33 percent said they worry about deportations. On the other hand, 72 percent of non-voters worry that they, a family member, or a close friend could be deported.

A Majority in the San Joaquin Valley Think that More Deportations Will Have a Negative Impact on the Region’s Economy
The survey of the San Joaquin Valley also found that a large majority of adults, 63 percent, think that more deportations will have a negative impact on the region’s economy. In contrast, 19 percent of respondents think that more deportations will have a positive effect, and 11 percent think deportations will have no impact. These views likely reflect the concern that more deportations could hurt the agricultural sector of the Valley economy. The U.S. Department of Labor estimates that about 56 percent of California’s hired crop workers are undocumented.
Among all racial and ethnic groups, either a plurality or a majority believe that more deportations would negatively impact the economy. Forty-five percent of white respondents, 75 percent of Latinos, and 63 percent of non-white, non-Latinos think that more deportations will have negative consequences. An almost equal percentage of white respondents (26 percent) and non-white, non- Latino respondents (27 percent), or about 1 out of 4, thinks more deportations will be good for the region’s economy.

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